LEARN HOW TO COOK

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Thursday, January 8, 2009

Braising

Braising (from the French “braiser”) is a combination cooking method using both moist and dry heat; typically the food is first seared at a high temperature and then finished in a covered pot with a variable amount of liquid, resulting in a particular flavour.

Braising relies on heat, time, and moisture to successfully break down tough connective tissue and collagens in meat; making it an ideal way to cook tougher cuts. Many classic braised dishes such as Coq au Vin are highly-evolved methods of cooking tough and unpalatable foods. Swiss steak, and pot roast are braised dishes.

Pressure cooking and slow cooking (e.g., crockpots) are forms of braising.Most braises follow the same basic steps. The food to be braised (meat, poultry, but also vegetables or mushrooms) is first seared in order to brown its surface and enhance its flavor. A cooking liquid that often includes an acidic element, such as tomatoes, beer, or wine, is added to the pot, often with stock, to not quite cover the meat. The dish is cooked covered at a very low simmer until meat is
fork tender. Often the cooking liquid is finished to create a sauce or gravy.

A successful braise intermingles the flavours of the foods being cooked and the cooking liquid. Also, the dissolved collagens and gelatins from the meat enrich and add body to the liquid. Braising is economical, as it allows the use of tough and inexpensive cuts, and efficient, as it often employs a single pot to cook an entire meal.
Braised pork spare ribs with preserved mustard greens.
Familiar braised dishes include pot roast, beef stew, Swiss steak, chicken cacciatore, goulash, Carbonade Flamande, braised tilapia and beef bourguignon, among others.

Braising is also used extensively in the cuisines of Asia, particularly Chinese cuisine